Neighborhood Wards

One of my tweeps made a comment about how the neighborhood she was living in was toxic and she needed to move. I’m not going to argue with someone’s assertion that she needs to move to a better environment: gods know the past year has show me the importance of leaving a place that you can’t thrive in. But such influences can be reduced or managed through effective warding.

I’ve already talked about warding your home, and I’ve even speculated about how you might ward a city. And in my own experience, I’ve had to struggle with warding a public space while living at a hotel. Warding a neighborhood is a more delicate and complex issue, because you’re probably doing it on your own, and you are probably trying to negate the influences of people who actually live there.

So I pondered the problem, and here’s what I came up with. Continue reading

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Finding Common Ground

“Group rituals should be about fostering cohesion and community among the group. The more diverse the group, the harder that can be. There is always some manner of common ground, but the mistake we often make is trying to look for it among religious or political ideology. Sometimes the very fact that people are coming together for a particular event is enough of a basis to build a ritual, and through that a community. I’m pretty sure that’s how it works with Burning Man.”

I’ve been talking about Heartland Pagan Festival for a while.

One of the features of the festival is a large ritual, that is often separated across three nights. There is traditionally an opening ritual, a main ritual, and a closing ritual. And these rituals are very complex and delicate operations.

Heartland is open to people of all Pagan and Pagan-friendly folks who want to come out for a good time. Which means that the Spiritual Experience Committee is responsible for devising a ritual that is appealing to as many people as possible, intense enough to provide a meaningful experience, and yet is not offensive to the hugely diverse and very left-of-center (and hence more likely to be offended) crowd in attendance. And they have problems pulling it of with a bang, on occasion. Continue reading